12 March - 16 March 2017 Join us at the Society of Toxicology 56th annual meeting ToxExpo!

Venue: Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD, USA
Date: 12 March – 16 March 2017
Booth: #2364

Cell health assays and Phenotypic Screening at ToxExpo

We will be showcasing TTP Labtech’s plate-based acumen Cellista, the perfect tool for your phenotypic cellular assays which can be utilised early in the discovery process to identify potential safety and efficacy related issues sooner, thereby reducing overall development costs and improving failure rates.

These assays include:

  • live/dead – using standard dyes such as calcein-AM/PI or TOTO-3/TMRMThese combinations provide a more cost-effective approach to bulk read assays, such as CellTitre–Glo®, and offer the benefit of multiplexing with additional phenotypic assays to gain more high content data
  • apoptosis – annexin V, Caspase-3, nuclear condensation
  • genotox – phophohistone H3

With plate read and analysis times as low as 2 ½  minutes, regardless of plate format, acumen Cellista can be used for primary screening in the determination of off-target drug effects in the earliest phases of drug discovery. Fast scan times and easy to use Cellista software mean it is ideal for multi-user environments such as core screening laboratories.

Cell cycle analysis is a widely employed biological application within drug discovery and biomedical research for investigating potential adverse toxicity effects, or on-target compound efficacy within a number of disease areas such as oncology, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders.

TTP Labtech’s acumen Cellista allows the determination of proliferation (total cell number/well), cytotoxicity (live/dead) and cell cycle analysis in a single assay using adherent cells in-situ, or suspension cells.

Its advantages include:

  • a simple dye-based method to identify DNA content (Hoeschst and Propidium Iodide) that can be enhanced by multiplexing with other markers of interest (e.g. mitotic index).
  • in situ analysis means a workflow that is easier to automate than flow cytometry that preserves cell morphology
  • the ability to discriminate between cytotoxic and cytostatic mechanism of action
  • plate read times from 5 minutes per plate for whole well analysis

acumen Cellista’s high throughput imaging capability and rapid analysis means it can conduct genome-wide screens in a matter of days rather than weeks: see Kittler, R. et al, (2007). Nature Cell Biology 9:1401-1412

Our team can also discuss with you our instruments used for:

  • flexible sample management workflows from ambient to -80°C (comPOUND, arktic, lab2lab)
  • unique low volume liquid handling for NGS, compound screening and MALDI-TOF (mosquito, dragonfly).

Want to find out more? We offer a full range of resources, read our application notes and posters here…

application notes

acumen: multiplex measurement of toxicity indicators

acumen: accurate cytotoxicity and proliferation determination by high-throughput phenotypic screening (white paper)

acumen: detecting kinase phosphorylation

acumen: detecting protein translocation

acumen: high throughput quantification of hepG2 cell colony formation in soft agar

acumen: rapid analysis of cell cycle phases

acumen: speeding up angiogenesis assays

posters

acumen: a practical solution for phenotypic screening of a full compound library

acumen: an integrated solution to provide phenotypic primary and secondary screening of full deck compound libraries

acumen: eliminating the false negatives in ATP-luminescence cell health assays by the use of a phenotypic assay approach

acumen: high-throughput imaging of cellular models

acumen: rapid analysis of 3D cultures in soft agar and on ultra-low attachment plates using a laser scanning imaging system

acumen: rapid profiling of multiple toxicity indicators

Phenotypic screening of a full compound library… A reality or a pipe(line) dream?

>> prefer to watch a video to find out more? Click here

For more information about the Society of Toxicology 56th annual meeting and ToxExpo visit their website here!

ToxExpo_2017

blog: New drugs need bold approaches

Turning the screening scenario on its head

The pharmaceutical industry is under immense pressure to find better ways to bring new drugs to market, given the dwindling pipeline and the astronomical cost of late-stage failures. So, is the screening pool from which we select compounds just too small, or not chemically diverse enough?

Screening library subsets is designed to capture all the areas of the chemical space within a company’s full compound library, but by screening a much smaller number of compounds to allow the use of more complex phenotypic assays that provide data closer to the in vivo goal.

“However,” says TTP Labtech’s Dr Paul Wylie, “I believe that this approach is flawed as the subsets are selected on target-based information. Using data from historic target-based screens to select subsets for phenotypic screens runs the risk of missing good quality hits – or selecting poor compounds for next stage interrogation. Just because a compound is in a similar chemical space to another molecule, doesn’t necessarily mean that it will exert the same phenotypic response, in vivo.”

A good example is the catecholamines: dopamine, noradrenalin and adrenaline.  Whilst they only differ by the addition of a single functional group, they exert very different physiological responses (see table 3).

structure function
dopamine  mirrorball_blog_dopamine_Dec16 Inside the brain, dopamine plays important roles in motor control, motivation, cognitive control, reinforcement, and reward, as well as a number of basic lower-level functions including lactation, and nausea.
noradrenaline  mirrorball_blog_noradrenaline_Dec16 Medically it is used in those with severe hypotension. It does this by increasing vascular tone (tension of vascular smooth muscle) through α-adrenergic receptor activation.
adrenaline  mirrorball_blog_adrenaline_Dec16 As a medication it is used for a number of conditions including: anaphylaxis, cardiac arrest, and superficial bleeding. Maybe used for asthma when other treatments are not effective. Inhaled epinephrine maybe be used to improve the symptoms of croup.

Table 3.

“In my view,” says Dr Wylie, “it is time to turn the screening scenario on its head. Screening is about excluding the compounds that are not useful; so, instead of screening in a target-based way first, then using a phenotypic response to backup the data, we should screen phenotypically and follow up with target-based identification.”

What would be the requirements to successfully implement phenotypic screening at primary throughputs? “Target-based screening was adopted partly because it was easy to automate, fast, reproducible and relatively inexpensive to run on very large compound sets”, he explains. So, just how far off running a full deck phenotypic screen are we?

We would need:

  1. Automation to run assays in 1536-well plates, to achieve the required throughput. Many liquid handling systems are now able to do this very effectively.
  2. Manageable cell costs/cell numbers. Primary cells and iPS cell lines are more physiologically relevant but incur higher costs. HTS requires the use of around 100 cells per 1536-well plate to make these cost-effective.
  3. Consistent, fast scan and analysis times to fit into a fully automated HTS process. This is important because many HCA instruments have variable read times.
  4. Manageable data files from 2-3 million wells.
  5. Straightforward biology.

Dr Wylie believes that throughput and assay complexity are perceived to be the main barriers to running a full deck phenotypic HTS, but, he asks, “Is that really true?”

  • The biology itself can be limiting, but only in certain projects. Phenotypic screening is robust. “Many phenotypic assays look at quite basic readouts: cell viability (live dead/apoptosis), reporter gene expression, cell cycle, angiogenesis formation. These are simple assays to screen,” he points out.
  • For throughput: “it is true that many typical imaging systems do not fulfill the criteria for a HTS manager to run in a full-deck screen. So it is best not to use a standard microscope-based imaging system”, he concludes.

Laser-scanning imaging cytometers (LSICs), such as acumen Cellista (TTP Labtech), combine object recognition with bulk read speeds (typically under 5 minutes per 1536-well plate). It requires fewer cells (typically 100/well). It also produces very small file sizes, so the IT requirements are the same as for target-based screening. These features mean that LSICs like acumen Cellista are ideally placed to remove the compromises and offer practical high throughput, full deck phenotypic screening.

“The costs of phenotypic primary screens are higher than traditional target-based screening; but it is surely much cheaper than pursuing poor compounds which fail at later stage drug development,” explains Dr Wylie.

“I believe the only barrier to running full deck phenotypic screening today is the willingness and belief to accept it as a key area of drug screening and then to implement it.”

news: Affordable automation for protein crystallographers – the ultimate lab bundle for 2017

Affordable automation for protein crystallographers – the ultimate lab bundle for 2017

Starting in 2017, our lab bundle pack is designed to automate your crystallisation drop setting and optimisation whilst meeting increasingly demanding budgets. With over 300 academic publications in 2 years referencing mosquito, we know how important it is to provide you with productivity and peace of mind in your daily research. Utilising the superior positive displacement technology of TTP Labtech’s mosquito and dragonfly, you can benefit from unrivalled accuracy and repeatability of across a wide range of viscosities, combined with effortless, intuitive software accessible to even the most novice user.

  • 3 protein crystallisation instruments
  • 2 year full warranty
  • 1 unlimited software licences

>>Get your lab bundle

The lab bundle pack includes:

  • mosquito® Crystal (2-way) & dragonfly® (5-head) & MXone
  • consumables pack for mosquito & dragonfly
  • extended 2-year guarantee including a product maintenance visit
  • unlimited software licences

TTP Labtech’s mosquito & dragonfly delivers:

  • unrivalled accuracy and repeatability at nanolitre volume using our unique true-positive displacement technology
  • versatile workflows to miniaturise and automate processes to save time and precious crystals
  • robust and very easy to use, suitable multi-user labs
  • proven track record of research success by 300+ publications in 2 years

>>Get your lab bundle

ask the expert link

 

 

 

blog: Screening methodologies

Counting compounds in or out?

In the search for new drugs, the harvest of low hanging fruit and increased regulatory hurdles have decreased R&D productivity. Many candidates incur enormous financial losses by failing very late in clinical trials. But this failure is due to safety/toxicity concerns as opposed to lack of efficacy. So, are we using the best methods to select our hit compounds?

Target-based high-throughput screening 

In the 1990s, companies turned to target-based primary screening to screen more compounds in a reliable manner. Target-based screening typically uses overexpressing proteins identified as having a key role in the disease area to make a consistent, sensitive model. The assays are robust biochemical ones that are easily automated to run in high throughput, as a pharmaceutical compound library is now around 2-3 million compounds. However, once hit compounds are identified, their effects then need to be checked in a biological system.

Target-based screening has generated many ‘hits’, but there has been a greater failure in the clinic due to poor target validation early on in the drug discovery process. The main cost in drug discovery is not the initial high throughput screen; it is the stages after that.

“People often talk about screening as finding ‘hit’ compounds. Paradoxically, in my opinion, it is about screening out the compounds that are no good – so they aren’t pursued and money is not wasted in the later stages of drug discovery” say Dr Paul Wylie, TTP Labtech’s Head of Applications.

Phenotypic Screening: gaining physiological relevance

There is now a renewed interest in phenotypic screening as a discovery tool. “The real benefit”, says Dr Wylie, “is seeing what each compound actually does to a cell; not just to an isolated protein in a non-physiological environment.”

High Content Screening (HCS) is a standard automated approach to look at phenotypic changes within the cell in response to a compound. Normally, multiple features of each individual cell or organism present are measured. It is this that underpins the approach’s true power.

“HCS enables phenotypic assays that can measure changes within a cell, or movement between cells, or permit the analysis of specific sub-populations of cells in a heterogeneous mix, that would be difficult or impossible to perform with other technologies,” explains Dr Wylie.

“High content assays are amongst the most demanding assays to run on a large scale since they involve using live cells, multiplexing of fluorescent dyes/proteins or probes and have multiple readouts,” he continues.

The vast majority of HCS readers are based on automated microscopy. “Initially, these techniques, whilst powerful, were difficult to use, relatively slow and presented barriers to a mass uptake within pharma” says Dr Wylie. “Over the last 15 years, many of the issues have been addressed and, today, they are used in mainstream R&D for phenotypic screening, which is smaller scale”.

The reasons for not using them in primary screening are:

  • microscope-based high content imaging systems are relatively slow compared to target-based screening methods
  • they are generally incompatible with high density (1536-well) microplates
  • they generate large data sets

“Sophisticated IT storage systems are available to archive these large amounts of data”, says Dr Wylie, “but the IT infrastructure to handle the data effectively and – crucially – retrieval of the data can still be a pain point.”

Another problem is that modern screens have focussed on more physiologically-relevant cell lines, which now include primary cell lines and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). “These cells are ever closer to a true in vivo model, but the numbers normally required to run a phenotypic screen can make the cost prohibitive,” explains Dr Wylie.

Is primary screening afraid of phenotypic assays?

“With the availability of significant improvements in assay reagents, labware and readers, I believe it is now possible to run a cost-effective, robust approach to screening entire compound libraries in a phenotypic manner,” says Dr Wylie.

Laser-scanning imaging cytometers (LSICs), such as acumen Cellista (TTP Labtech), combine object recognition with bulk read speeds (typically under 5 minutes per plate). It requires far fewer cells (typically 100/well). It also produces very small file sizes, so the IT requirements are the same as for target-based screening. This means that LSICs like acumen Cellista are ideally placed to offer practical high throughput, full deck phenotypic screening.

“The costs, it is true, are higher than traditional target-based screening approaches;” states Dr Wylie, “but it is surely a much cheaper way forward than pursuing poor compounds that ultimately fail at later stage drug development. Screening is about excluding the compounds that are not useful, not necessarily about finding the hits.”

blog: Let’s talk crystallography in Asia and Oceania

Let’s talk crystallography in Asia and Oceania.

Hanoi, Vietnam will become ‘The city of crystallography’ from 3 – 7th December, hosting the 14th conference of the Asian Crystallography Association (AsCA 2016) and
TTP Labtech’s protein crystallography open workshop.

This region has a long and distinguished history in the field of crystallography:

  • Bragg’s Law, formulated by the Australian Lawrence Bragg
  • seminal contributions to the crystal engineering of organic molecules (India)
  • coordination polymers (Australia, Japan, Hong Kong and China).

This is highlighted in a recent themed issue of a Royal Society of Chemistry journal celebrating Crystallography in the Asia-Pacific region (CrystEngComm (2014) 16: 6276). This region is also one of the youngest and the fastest growing of the four Regional Associates of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr).

If you are going to AsCA 2016 and would like to join us for a relaxing afternoon of talks by leading crystallographers in both industry and academia and meet other users of
TTP Labtech’s liquid handling instruments, please come along on Saturday 3rd Dec at 11am at Hotel Mövenpick, 83 Lý Thường Kiệt, Cửa Nam, Hoàn Kiếm, Hà Nội. Following the talks and discussions, you will be able to delight in the tasty traditional Vietnamese cuisine following a Hanoi sightseeing. At this open workshop you will have the chance to learn more about best practices and successful strategies to crystallise proteins using
TTP Labtech’s range of mosquito® and dragonfly® liquid handlers. This is a FREE event, but places are limited so please sign up to avoid disappointment.

The following speakers at the workshop will also be available for informal discussions during the day:

Dr. Andrew Doré “Extra-helical binding site of a Glucagon Receptor antagonist: problems and solutions using the mosquito LCP”

Dr. Andrew Doré is Director of Crystallography at Heptares Therapeutics, UK. His work addresses some of the hurdles associated with the instability of GPCRs and aims to generate small molecules and therapeutic antibodies targeting challenging or previously undruggable GPCRs.

Prof. Kurt Krause “Simplified Method for Influenza Neuraminidase Purification for Structural Studies”

Prof. Kurt Krause is Director of the Webster Centre for Infectious Diseases and a Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Otago. His group focus on the structural biology of infectious diseases.

Dr. S. Ramaswamy is an Senior Professor at Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, India. His research interests lay in the area of protein-protein interaction networks of translocation pathways and lipid signaling. His general research question is ‘what could be the differences in the modulation and dynamics of protein complexes/ lipids between normal cells and cell under the stress?’

If you would like to find out more about the mosquito range of liquid handlers or dragonfly please contact our experts at crystallography@ttplabtech.com.

 

 

18 Oct - 22 Oct 2016 ASHG 2016 recap

Thanks to everyone who spoke with us at ASHG 2016!

In case you missed it, you can find a full recap!

mosquito liquid handlers for genomics

features:

  • superior accuracy and precision coupled with high speed transfers using true positive displacement pipetting technology
  • reduce sample and reagent requirements to 20 pg or less of nucleic acid and up to 50-fold reduction in reagents
  • no cross-contamination, no carryover with our low-cost disposable pipettes
  • be in control with the simple software interface by easily creating new protocol

application areas

low volume liquid handling with mosquito HTS, HV and X1

  • synthetic & molecular biology: High-throughput, miniaturised reactions for PCR, cloning and DNA assembly with mosquito
  • nucleic acid sequencing: Low cost, low volume library preparation for single cell analysis, including DNAseq, RNAseq and normalisation
  • gene expression profiling: Cost-effective, high-throughput analysis of mRNA with rapid qPCR set-up

Poster title: Automated, low-cost, miniaturized RNA-Seq and DNAseq library preps

>>Get our latest app note here: This application note presents a high-throughput, miniaturised workflow, in which differentiated pancreatic stems cells were studied using single-cell RNA-Seq (scRNA-Seq), in Dr. Louise Laurent’s lab at University of California, San Diego, USA.

>>Watch our free on-demand tutorial here: Low-volume, automated single cell RNA-seq library preparation

>>Read the latest JALA publication here: Miniaturization Technologies for Efficient Single-Cell Library Preparation for Next-Generation Sequencing

Are you interested in a demo? >>Book it here!

19 Mar - 22 Mar 2017 Discover mosquito at the 2017 West Coast Protein Crystallisation Workshop

Discover mosquito at the 2017 West Coast Protein Crystallisation Workshop

Venue: Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA, USA
Date: 19th – 22nd March

The WCPCW has a strong emphasis on presentations by students and postdoctorals. It provides an outstanding opportunity to learn about latest advances and trends, exchange practical advice, and interact with peers and scientific leaders.

Keynote speakers:

  • John Kuriyan is an innovative world-leader in the application of x-ray crystallography to important questions of biological mechanism including the regulation of kinases.
  • Tamir Gonen is at the forefront of developing the approach of micro electron diffraction, which has the potential to transform the practice of crystallography.

Our experts will also be on hand showcasing mosquito Crystal®. Discover how you can automate all the popular protein crystallisation techniques with smaller volumes and no cross contamination. – Resulting in cost savings and more extensive screening!

>>Read about the latest techniques and research from your protein crystallography peers in our latest edition of labCrystal

image_link_labCrystal_July16

 

28 Feb - 14 Mar 2017 Meet our genomics team at the Illumina European UGM Series!

Meet our genomics team at the Illumina European UGM Series!

We are excited to be able to join Illumina’s User Group Meeting series in Europe! Not only is it a great opportunity for you to learn more about the advancements in genomics, it’s also a great opportunity to meet our team and find out how mosquito® range can help you further your genomics research!

Cologne, Germany: Radisson Blu Hotel
Date: 28th February – 1st March
For more information on the event or to register, contact: Rachel Heslop  rheslop@illumina.com   +44 (0)1223 824878

Nottingham, UK: Nottingham Conference Centre
Date: 7th – 8th March
For more information on the event or to register, contact: Kate Byrne    kbyrne@illumina.com   +44 (0)1223 824875

Stockholm, Sweden: The Brewery Conference Centre
Date: 9th – 10th March
For more information on the event or to register, contact: Ann Williams-Bull
awilliams-bull@illumina.com   +44 (0)1223 824841

Marceille, France: Golden Tulip Villa Massalia Hotel
Date: 13th – 14th March
For more information on the event or to register, contact: Sally Ann Rymer sarymer@illumina.com   +44 (0)1223 824876

 

mosquito liquid handlers for genomics
features:

  • superior accuracy and precision coupled with high speed transfers using true positive displacement pipetting technology
  • reduce sample and reagent requirements to 20 pg or less of nucleic acid and up to 50-fold reduction in reagents
  • no cross-contamination, no carryover with our low-cost disposable pipettes
  • be in control with the simple software interface by easily creating new protocol

application areas

low volume liquid handling with mosquito HTS, HV and X1

  • synthetic & molecular biology: High-throughput, miniaturised reactions for PCR, cloning and DNA assembly with mosquito
  • nucleic acid sequencing: Low cost, low volume library preparation for single cell analysis, including DNAseq, RNAseq and normalisation
  • gene expression profiling: Cost-effective, high-throughput analysis of mRNA with rapid qPCR set-up

>>Read the latest JALA publication here: Miniaturization Technologies for Efficient Single-Cell Library Preparation for Next-Generation Sequencing

This year, illumina will be featuring many interactive sessions and new program enhancements:

  • Application reviews featuring the latest technologies from new sample preparations to data analysis tools, for applications like single cell sequencing, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), immuno-oncology and much more
  • Product updates in arrays and sequencing, highlighting how researchers are combining array-based DNA Methylation with RNA-Seq to better characterize human disease
  • Breakout sessions featuring the following topics:
    • Epigenetics (arrays + sequencing)
    • Next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical research environment
    • Immuno-Oncology research
    • Single-cell
  • Panel discussions:
    • Multi-omics approaches focusing on the integration of quantitative, qualitative, and genomic data into one file
    • Core Lab Panel: How to drive a multi-omics core?
    • Agrigenomics
  • One-on-one appointment scheduling and a mobile event application for the meeting

Who Should Attend:
illumina User Group Meetings are exclusively for those who own, use, or have their data generated on Illumina instrumentation. The presentations will cover a broad range of applications, and are designed for new or experienced users in the areas of optimisation of the sequencing workflow or bioinformatics.

illumina banner

28 March - 30 March 2017 Join us at the Forum Labo Paris meeting!

Venue: Paris expo Porte de Versailles, Hall 4, France
Date: 28 March – 30 March 2017
Booth: TBC

Discover your laboratory essentials at Forum Labo Paris!

TTP Labtech designs and manufactures robust, reliable and easy-to-use solutions for sample management, liquid handling and multiplexed detection in drug discovery. We enable life scientists through collaboration, deep application knowledge and leading engineering to accelerate research and make a difference together. Our essential tools include state-of-the-art solutions developed for:

For more information about the Forum Labo & ELRIG.Fr meeting visit their website here.

Banner_Forum_Labo_2017

 

9 March 2017 Join us at the ELRIG.de forum meeting!

Venue: Darmstadtium – Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany
Date: 9 March 2017
Booth: TBC

Cell Based Phenotypic Screening

We will be showcasing TTP Labtech’s plate-based acumen Cellista, the perfect tool for your phenotypic cellular assays which can be utilised early in the discovery process to identify potential safety and efficacy related issues sooner, thereby reducing overall development costs and improving failure rates.

These assays include:

  • live/dead – using standard dyes such as calcein-AM/PI or TOTO-3/TMRMThese combinations provide a more cost-effective approach to bulk read assays, such as CellTitre–Glo®, and offer the benefit of multiplexing with additional phenotypic assays to gain more high content data
  • apoptosis – annexin V, Caspase-3, nuclear condensation
  • genotox – phophohistone H3

With plate read and analysis times as low as 2 ½  minutes, regardless of plate format, acumen Cellista can be used for primary screening in the determination of off-target drug effects in the earliest phases of drug discovery. Fast scan times and easy to use Cellista software mean it is ideal for multi-user environments such as core screening laboratories.

Cell cycle analysis is a widely employed biological application within drug discovery and biomedical research for investigating potential adverse toxicity effects, or on-target compound efficacy within a number of disease areas such as oncology, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders.

TTP Labtech’s acumen Cellista allows the determination of proliferation (total cell number/well), cytotoxicity (live/dead) and cell cycle analysis in a single assay using adherent cells in-situ, or suspension cells.

Its advantages include:

  • a simple dye-based method to identify DNA content (Hoeschst and Propidium Iodide) that can be enhanced by multiplexing with other markers of interest (e.g. mitotic index).
  • in situ analysis means a workflow that is easier to automate than flow cytometry that preserves cell morphology
  • the ability to discriminate between cytotoxic and cytostatic mechanism of action
  • plate read times from 5 minutes per plate for whole well analysis

acumen Cellista’s high throughput imaging capability and rapid analysis means it can conduct genome-wide screens in a matter of days rather than weeks: see Kittler, R. et al, (2007). Nature Cell Biology 9:1401-1412

>> Watch our video where Dr. Anne Hammerstein discusses 3D Phenotypic screening

Our team can also discuss with you our instruments used for:

  • flexible sample management workflows from ambient to -80°C (comPOUND, arktic, lab2lab)
  • unique low volume liquid handling for NGS, compound screening and MALDI-TOF (mosquito, dragonfly).

Want to find out more? We offer a full range of resources, read our application notes and posters here…

application notes

acumen: multiplex measurement of toxicity indicators

acumen: accurate cytotoxicity and proliferation determination by high-throughput phenotypic screening (white paper)

acumen: detecting kinase phosphorylation

acumen: detecting protein translocation

acumen: high throughput quantification of hepG2 cell colony formation in soft agar

acumen: rapid analysis of cell cycle phases

acumen: speeding up angiogenesis assays

posters

acumen: a practical solution for phenotypic screening of a full compound library

acumen: an integrated solution to provide phenotypic primary and secondary screening of full deck compound libraries

acumen: eliminating the false negatives in ATP-luminescence cell health assays by the use of a phenotypic assay approach

acumen: high-throughput imaging of cellular models

acumen: rapid analysis of 3D cultures in soft agar and on ultra-low attachment plates using a laser scanning imaging system

acumen: rapid profiling of multiple toxicity indicators

Phenotypic screening of a full compound library… A reality or a pipe(line) dream?

>> prefer to watch a video to find out more? Click here

For more information about the ELRIG.de meeting visit their website here.

image_logo_elrig_de

news: Plan ahead for your 2017 sol-R bead needs

Secure 2016 pricing for your 2017 sol-R™ bead deliveries?

sol_R_beads_promo_strip

We are pleased to be able to offer you an additional 10% off 2016 pricing from now until the 31st March 2017!

Do you regularly use sol-R™ beads in your assays? Why not place a standing order to ensure regular delivery of what you need? You can secure 2016 pricing for your 2017 sol-R bead standing order deliveries!

Not ready to commit, or are you new to sol-R beads? As an extra incentive, we’re pleased to be able to offer you an additional 10% off 2016 pricing from now until 31 March 2017 for you to evaluate this product!

Do you only work with cells?
Find out how cell and sol-R bead based assays may be combined to increase the content of your primary screening data and facilitate more informed decision making.

Improve productivity!
Save costs, time and sample through combining hit and counter-screens into one assay using a 3-plex mixed cell and bead protocol for simultaneous determination of:

  • specific binding (adherent cell type in suspension)
  • non-specific binding (suspension cell type)
  • titre (sol-R bead)

>> Download our new application note: no-wash antibody titre determination on the mirrorball fluorescence cytometer

>> Download the poster: simultaneous determination of antibody binding, specificity and titre on the mirrorball fluorescence cytometer

14 Mar - 15 Mar 2017 Discover our sample storage solutions at SLCM17

Discover our sample storage solutions at SLCM17.

SLAS Europe’s Compound Management Conference 2017

Venue: Berlin, Germany
Date: 14 Mar -15 Mar 2017

Breaking Down Walls – Uniting Sample Management Communities to Advance Scientific Innovation #SLASCM17

Effective design and management of compound collections is crucial to the success of research efforts in the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology and Agri-Science industries. In addition, academic organisations are establishing comprehensive compound management infrastructures to help realise their target validation and drug discovery goals.

TTP Labtech’s unique pneumatic technology uses a cushion of compressed air or nitrogen and a system of flexible tubes to transport microtubes. This makes our instrumentation extremely reliable and robust compared to traditional systems that use robots. Our modular stores, comPOUND® and arktic®, also minimise the use of moving parts that can malfunction in refrigerated conditions and our proven technology ensures that users will have maximum uptime and availability of their systems.

Downstream automation platforms such as automated liquid handlers can be used more efficiently by delivering samples to specific SBS rack locations, thereby avoiding the need for additional re-arraying steps.

Visit our booth and speak to our experts about how comPOUND® and arktic® can future proof your collection.

SLAS-Berlin_2017_banner